Scientists Embark on Bold Journey to Revive Extinct Dodo Bird in Mauritius

Scientists are embarking on a journey to bring the dodo bird back from extinction and reintroduce it to its native Mauritius.

This ambitious plan involves intricate genetic engineering and raises both hopes and concerns in the conservation community.

The dodo was a flightless bird native to Mauritius.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons /Frederick William Frohawk
The dodo was a flightless bird native to Mauritius.

The Science Behind Dodo De-Extinction

The dodo, a symbol of irreversible loss due to human impact, may fly again – metaphorically speaking. Colossal Biosciences, a US-based genetic engineering firm, is collaborating with the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation to resurrect the extinct dodo through sophisticated genetic techniques.

As CNN reports, Beth Shapiro, a paleogeneticist at Colossal, leads this initiative, having sequenced the full genome of the dodo and its closest living relative, the Nicobar pigeon.

Scientists plan to create a “functional dodo,” not an exact replica but a proxy adapted to modern environments, CNet reports. This involves editing primordial germ cells (PGCs) from the Nicobar pigeon to express dodo-like traits.

The challenges are immense, particularly because bird reproduction differs significantly from mammals, complicating the process of gene editing and embryo development.

The dodo was about one meter tall and weighed around 10-18 kilograms.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons / JaffaFalcon
The dodo was about one meter tall and weighed around 10-18 kilograms.

Recreating the Dodo’s Habitat

A critical aspect of this initiative is ensuring a suitable habitat for the dodos upon their return. Mauritius, once the dodo’s home, has undergone significant changes, with much of its native forests replaced by human developments, CNN reports.

Potential locations like Black River Gorges National Park and islets such as Round Island and Île aux Aigrettes are being evaluated for their suitability for the species, according to the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation. The team aims to find a balance between securing a predator-free environment and enabling public visibility for educational and conservation purposes.

The bird's extinction was primarily due to human activities and introduced species.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons / KKPCW
The bird’s extinction was primarily due to human activities and introduced species.

Ecological and Conservation Implications

The dodo’s reintroduction could have far-reaching ecological benefits.

Vikash Tatayah, director of conservation at the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation, said this project could have great potential positive impact on seed dispersal and ecosystem restoration. The bird’s large beak suggests it played a crucial role in dispersing large-seeded fruits, vital for some threatened plant species.

“I think (the dodo is) going to be a big bonus for the restoration of ecosystems,” Tatayah told CNN.

Early sailors to Mauritius contributed to the dodo’s extinction by hunting it.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons / BazzaDaRambler
Early sailors to Mauritius contributed to the dodo’s extinction by hunting it.

Ethical and Practical Challenges

While groundbreaking, the project raises several ethical and practical questions. Critics question the allocation of substantial resources for de-extinction, arguing that these could be better spent on protecting existing endangered species, reports the Natural History Museum. Furthermore, studies have shown there are concerns about the unpredictability of introducing a genetically edited species into a modern ecosystem, the potential creation of a genetic bottleneck, and the challenges of ensuring the animals’ welfare in a significantly altered environment.

The dodo’s story is a poignant reminder of the importance of conservation.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons / Jebulon
The dodo’s story is a poignant reminder of the importance of conservation.

Conservation Outlook: Beyond the Dodo

Despite these challenges, proponents believe the dodo project could stimulate broader conservation efforts. As Scientific American rerports, the techniques developed may be applicable to other avian species, potentially aiding in the conservation of endangered birds. The project is seen not just as a means to bring back an extinct species but as a symbol of hope and innovation in the face of biodiversity loss and climate change.

The dodo de-extinction initiative represents a bold step in conservation science. While the outcome is uncertain, its implications for genetic technology, ecological restoration, and conservation ethics will be far-reaching.

This venture into the unknown could redefine our approach to conservation and our relationship with the natural world.

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