The African Savannah’s Most Terrifying Sound Is Not What You Think

The vast African savannah is a world where the lion, with its regal roar, reigns supreme as the king of beasts. Yet, paradoxically, it’s not the lion’s thunderous growl that sends these magnificent creatures fleeing—it’s the sound of human conversation.

A study published in Current Biology, conducted within South Africa’s Kruger National Park, details a unique experiment. Researchers concealed speakers near watering holes, a lifeline for parched animals during the dry season. These speakers played recordings of people engaged in casual conversation, reflecting the local languages spoken in the region.

About 95% of the observed animals exhibited extreme fear and fled rapidly at the sound of human voices.

Surprisingly, the sound of lions' roars triggers less alarm among savannah mammals compared to human voices.
Photo: Pixabay
Surprisingly, the sound of lions’ roars triggers less alarm among savannah mammals compared to human voices.

“We usually think about large carnivore predators being at the top of the food chain, but humans are also lethal predators, and ones with a unique ecology,” Professor Liana Zanette, the study’s lead author, told the National History Museum. “The pervasiveness of the fear throughout the savannah mammal community is a real testament to the environmental impact that humans have. Our presence in that landscape is enough of a danger signal that these animals respond really strongly, way more than any other predator.”

The researchers also recorded the animals’ responses to other sounds. Recordings of lions’ snarls and growls triggered significantly less alarm among the wildlife. In fact, these majestic beasts, known as the apex predators of the savannah, prompted a markedly milder reaction.

Notably, when subjected to human voices, some elephants even attempted to confront the presumed source of the sound—a stark contrast to their response to lions, The Independent reports. This begs the question: why do African mammals perceive human voices as a greater threat than the fearsome lion?

African savannah animals exhibit extreme fear in response to human voices, often fleeing when they hear them.
Photo: Pixabay
African savannah animals exhibit extreme fear in response to human voices, often fleeing when they hear them.

A Lesson in Survival

The answer to this perplexing enigma appears rooted in survival instincts honed over generations. The animals populating Kruger National Park, including antelopes, elephants, giraffes, leopards, and warthogs, have seemingly learned to associate human presence with extreme danger. This learned fear could be attributed to a dark history of hunting, firearms, and the deployment of dogs for pursuit.

“There’s this idea that the animals are going to habituate to humans if they’re not hunted. But we’ve shown that this isn’t the case,” said co-author Micheal Clinchy. “The fear of humans is ingrained and pervasive, so this is something that we need to start thinking about seriously for conservation purposes.”

Sound as a Conservation Tool

Amid this revelation lies a glimmer of hope—a potential avenue for wildlife conservation. According to Geo News, human-generated sounds could serve as a tool to deter illegal poaching, which threatens numerous vulnerable species inhabiting these ecosystems.

Strategically deployed human voices could safeguard areas vulnerable to poaching activities. Rhinos, for instance, abandoned waterholes much quicker when they heard human voices over other sounds. This proactive approach could help drive threatened species away from locations where poachers lie in wait, potentially saving lives and preserving biodiversity.

African mammals are twice as likely to flee the sound of humans compared to the fearsome sounds of lions, gunfire, or dogs.
Photo: Pixabay
African mammals are twice as likely to flee the sound of humans compared to the fearsome sounds of lions, gunfire, or dogs.

Humans: The Unprecedented Superpredator

This startling discovery further deepens our understanding of humans’ impact on the natural world. Humans are not just apex predators; we are unparalleled superpredators. In a 2015 paper, our species was compared to other terrestrial and marine predators, revealing that humans hunt other land-based carnivores at a rate nine times higher than any other animal. Additionally, we fish at rates up to 14 times greater than marine predators.

Conservation Challenges and Tourism Impact

While this discovery holds promise for conservation efforts, it also raises challenges for tourism in African reserves. Previous studies have shown that the strong anti-predator responses exhibited by animals in the presence of human voices can alter their behavior and impact their reproductive rates.

To mitigate these effects, some areas may need to be declared off-limits to tourists, providing a sanctuary for affected animals. However, this could also jeopardize the funding of reserves that rely on tourism revenue.

African mammals are twice as likely to flee the sound of humans compared to the fearsome sounds of lions, gunfire, or dogs.
Photo: Pixabay
African mammals are twice as likely to flee the sound of humans compared to the fearsome sounds of lions, gunfire, or dogs.

As we confront this newfound knowledge, it presents an opportunity for both conservationists and tourists. By harnessing the power of human voices, we can protect vulnerable species and preserve the delicate balance of life on the savannah, ensuring that this awe-inspiring realm continues to thrive for generations to come.

Sign the petition and help us take action for endangered species.

Help Rescue Animals

Provide food and vital supplies to shelter pets at The Animal Rescue Site for free!

Whizzco